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Jahlil Okafor has no timetable for college decision, says father

Jul 30, 2013, 11:15 PM EST

Jimmy Kelley/Flickr Jimmy Kelley/Flickr

Jahlil Okafor, the top rated player in the Class of 2014, is down to eight schools and now that the July live period has come to a close the college basketball world is awaiting his college decision.

The decision of the Whitney Young (Ill.) 6-foot-11 center is made more important due to the package deal is rumored to be apart of along with five-star point guard Tyus Jones of Apple Valley High School (Minn.). Okafor had previously stated that there is a 99.9% chance the duo would commit to the same school. Jones has said in the past he wants to make his decision around November, however Okafor’s father Chuck told the Chicago Sun-Times that his son has no timetable to make a commitment.

“We don’t really have a set timeline,” Chuck Okafor told Michael O’Brien of the Sun-Times on Tuesday. “I think the boys would like to do it soon, but there is no way you can set a timeline right now it’s wishful thinking. I know they both would like to. The media is funny. Everyone sees one thing and writes something, puts it on their own pay site and runs with it.”

Okafor and Jones share six similar schools on their respective lists — Baylor, Duke, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan State and Ohio State. Top-20 recruit Justise Winslow has also been linked to be part of a package deal with Okafor and Jones.

“At this point I don’t see why it would change,” Chuck Okafor said of the promise between Okafor and Jones. “Could it change? Possibly. Do I see it happening? I don’t know. It is two different people, two different cities. They are loyal to each other. They are steadfast and they have a great idea what they are going to do together at the next level.”

Chuck Okafor told the Sun-Times that his son and Jones have no idea where they are going at this point, refuting any notion that there is a perceived favorite.

“I don’t know what Jahlil and Tyus are gonna do at this point, so for anyone else to say they do is far-fetched,” he said. “They are still at a standstill.”