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Jay Bilas blasts NCAA on Twitter in wake of Johnny Manziel scandal, Ed O’Bannon case (PHOTOS)

Aug 6, 2013, 6:05 PM EST

Jay Bilas AP

Jay Bilas is many things.

He’s a Duke grad, as talented of a college basketball analyst as he is photobomber. He’s also an avid Twitter user — more than 530,000 followers — and when it comes to the NCAA, he isn’t shy about voicing his criticism.

Over the weekend, the NCAA began investigating Texas A&M sophomore quarterback and reigning Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel for allegedly selling autographs. For several years now the NCAA has been in a battle with former UCLA forward Ed O’Bannon, who sued the organization in 2009 for using his likeness in a video game. The NCAA was still profiting off O’Bannon, which forced the lawsuit, and the NCAA is currently profiting on Manziel. Bilas was more than happy to spend his Tuesday exposing that by using the NCAA’s online store, ShopNCAASports.com .

  1. philliesblow - Aug 6, 2013 at 6:39 PM

    LOVE this! If Jay isn’t careful the NCAA will pressure ESPN to find a reason to drop him.

  2. packhawk04 - Aug 6, 2013 at 7:00 PM

    College athletes should not get paid. Period. End of discussion.

    • llfreedman - Aug 7, 2013 at 5:32 PM

      seriously? Was this just a troll statement?

  3. barkleyblows - Aug 6, 2013 at 7:26 PM

    Stop with the let’s pay athletes crap.

    Pretty sure they get enough crap free.

  4. elwaysagenius - Aug 6, 2013 at 8:44 PM

    I don’t think schools should pay their players, but a player shouldn’t be penalized for finding ways to make money off their name.

  5. motobus - Aug 6, 2013 at 9:48 PM

    “College athletes should not get paid. Period. End of discussion.”

    Why?

    • thraiderskin - Aug 7, 2013 at 12:55 PM

      They get an education and countless opportunities that the rest of us do not, due to their time at the school. If we are going to pay them, then they should also cover part of their tuition, books, housing and food. Just like normal students who also have jobs.

      • thraiderskin - Aug 7, 2013 at 12:57 PM

        Also, when I was in highschool I had to buy my own cleats… they should have to cover that as well.

      • llfreedman - Aug 7, 2013 at 5:29 PM

        There are so many things here with I don’t know where to start.
        1. All these countless opportunities…these kids are using their incredible gifts for free jeopardizing their careers if they get hurt. There are more full contact practices in ncaa football than the nfl now because ncaa has no union looking out for players (or do I mean “student athletes?”…
        2. The programs don’t allow these kids to get the same kind of education you or me would…its a full time job…oh wait- except you don’t get paid!
        3. Just like normal students who also have jobs? When did you go to college the 60? Part time jobs can’t pay for school/books/housing anymore anyway because tuition is way too high.
        4. These countless opportunities exist regardless of college- that’s just the medium they are forced to use until the pros let them in…

      • llfreedman - Aug 7, 2013 at 5:31 PM

        to clarify point 3: you are right they should have all those things paid for, but they aren’t “normal students.” This is the myth of the “student athlete.” If you have extremely valuable/successful skills in a billion dollar industry- you deserve to be compensated in some capacity…

      • koufaxmitzvah - Aug 8, 2013 at 7:57 AM

        A normal student, with a job, has money to fill up the tank and take out a date.

        I know it’s chic to consider every athlete on campus hip, happening, and cool enough to be treated with free pizza pies and pitchers of brew, but if you don’t have scratch to take a date to the movies, and the NCAA is making millions off your likeness, there is something wrong.

      • thraiderskin - Aug 8, 2013 at 12:58 PM

        They are students none-the-less, they must uphold academic eligibility, their degrees still count, the fact they played big time ball affords them (much) greater recognition, it also gives them access to greater alumni support. U can act like they don’t go to school, but they do and for free (since educational opportunities isnt a form of payment).

  6. jbeagles23 - Aug 6, 2013 at 11:32 PM

    They shouldn’t get paid a salary. However should get a peice of the pie when using their name

  7. pastabelly - Aug 6, 2013 at 11:49 PM

    Of course college athletes should get paid. They are the product in a $billion industry. There is very little about college football and basketball that would have anyone believe these kids are just playing games for the fun of it. If accounting interns get paid, so should these “interns”.

  8. northstarnic - Aug 7, 2013 at 7:18 AM

    Love it. I do believe the C in NCAA stands for crooked. Funny thing is, NCAA excuses its actions by saying these kids get a free education. Most of them don’t want, many don’t get an education. They just want to get paid to play ball.

  9. whitdog23 - Aug 7, 2013 at 8:33 AM

    so Bilas is admitting a Duke education is worthless and not desired. that players would rather get ‘paid’ then go to class

    • zane2626 - Aug 8, 2013 at 1:30 AM

      Really dude? You talk about education but failed to use “than” and used “then”. Try not to look dumb.

  10. taylorgang24 - Aug 7, 2013 at 12:26 PM

    The argument isn’t let’s pay players, that would make them professionals. The argument is let the players make money off the selling of their name and identity. Every other student except athletes can profit any way they want. The only ones who can’t profit ironically are the ones bringing the college millions of dollars. The NCAA makes 4.8 billion dollars a year in merchandise sales. It’s an absolute joke that they hoard it all for themselves under the guide of amateur competition.

  11. thraiderskin - Aug 7, 2013 at 1:01 PM

    I’m not against royalties for after the fact, but the pay to play is asinine.

  12. thraiderskin - Aug 7, 2013 at 1:11 PM

    One more thing, since we r talking about what is “fair.” All student athletes should have to meet the academic requirements of their school of choice ( we’ll ignore the extracurricular requirements that playing a sport doesn’t cover). That should really level the playing field.

    • packersrule52 - Aug 7, 2013 at 4:42 PM

      Um, they already do have to meet academic requirements for the school they choose…? Why do you think there’s always the yearly talk about whether or not player X or Z is going to be eligible to play?

      As for your comments above, many of them wouldn’t get those opportunities if not for their physical ability. I don’t think all student athletes should be paid but certainly those that play football and basketball. Both sports bring in major revenues for the university, and both sports popularity is only increasing year by year. Yes, their school is totally paid for but most of these kids have no money to their name. If you were in that situation, you’d probably accept money to so you could buy food and to go out and do what most other students are doing. I’m sure some will say then they should get a job but that’s not all that realistic when you’re playing a Division 1 sport. I played D3 basketball, and even then between my commitment to basketball and school I had next to no time for a job.

      We’re talking about a billion $ industry here. And like Bilas pointed out, they ARE making money off of specific player names. I don’t think it’s even the least bit asinine to pay them some sort of stipend.

      • thraiderskin - Aug 8, 2013 at 1:11 PM

        Student athletes don’t meet the same academic standards of other normal student, r u kidding me? Have u heard the majority of big time athletes speak? Lebron James didn’t even go to college and he sounds like a genius compared to most 4 year grad players. C’mon man… if these guys need to get paid like anyone else in society, then they should be held to the same standards. You people want what’s fair, fine, pay them for their work and value, then charge them for what they owe and hold them to the exact same requirements. If school X asks for 3.2 GPA and a 1200 SAT and an avg of 10 hour/week extracurricular, just to get into the school, then the paid student athlete needs that as well… boom, what’s fair is fair.

  13. packersrule52 - Aug 8, 2013 at 2:51 PM

    @raiderskin – all the athletes admitted do meet those requirements. You need a 2.5 gpa and 18 on your ACT (not sure about SAT, as I’m from Midwest and its not typically used around here) to be qualified under the NCAA clearinghouse (though could be different now as that was of 09′).

    I had a friend who was being looked by UW – Madison, Michigan St., and many more. He ended up going D1-AA though because he just barely fulfilled those standards above. And most of the Big Ten schools looking at him were looking for somebody with better grades.

  14. packersrule52 - Aug 8, 2013 at 2:57 PM

    And again, I’ll reiterate: the sport they play is a full time job. A coach or player would never admit it publicly, but in many cases school comes second. It’s hard to blame them for taking a BS major, that’s easier.

    And to be honest, these kids are bringing in money for the school. Your average student is not. Why should they have to have the same academic qualifications? I don’t have a problem with them being allowed some leeway considering what they’re doing for the school. And you’ve also gotta taken into consideration that many of these athletes are coming from inner city schools, which aren’t on the same level as most suburban schools.

  15. spzzie - Aug 8, 2013 at 5:14 PM

    Athletes deserve to be paid. They get a free education but how much time do they get to spend in the classroom or studying? How often do these students get to go home? Are these students allowed to have a job, oh sports is their job. Athletes spend way more time practicing than they do in the classroom

  16. packhawk04 - Aug 8, 2013 at 7:41 PM

    They get a free education. Thats payment enough.

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