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Former Miami forward DeQuan Jones latest to comment on Johnny Manziel

Aug 29, 2013, 5:06 PM EDT

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With the news coming out yesterday that Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel would be suspended for the first half of the Aggies’ season opener against Rice on Saturday, many have voiced their opinions on the subject. There were comments from notable sports figures such as Deion Sanders, with more than a few people wondering how such a suspension was possible.

But with the NCAA unable to come up with any tangible evidence that the Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback was paid to sign memorabilia, the governing body and Texas A&M agreed to suspend Manziel for violating “the spirit” of an NCAA bylaw. Another individual with an interesting take on the Manziel saga is former Miami forward DeQuan Jones, whose name came up in the Nevin Shapiro case that the school has yet to receive a final ruling on.

Jones was alleged to have received $10,000 from an assistant coach (who received the money from Shapiro) while being recruited by the school, and while being investigated Jones was forced to sit out ten games at the start of the 2011-12 season. Ultimately Jones would be cleared of any wrongdoing, but having to sit out for something you didn’t do tends to leave a bad taste in one’s mouth. With that, Jones took to Twitter to voice his opinions about collegiate athletics’ governing body.

There’s more on Jones’ timeline regarding the NCAA’s governing “strategies.”

Some may argue that with his college career already finished, there’s no sense in Jones “crying over spilled milk.” But on the other hand, is he really wrong to be upset with the NCAA over this? Hard to argue that Jones is in the wrong.

But the lessons to be learned from Manziel’s story for any college athlete when faced with a similar problem: get yourself a lawyer (for when it’s time to talk to investigators), and make sure that if you do break the rules and accept compensation (note: not saying that Manziel broke the rules) it’s in cash.

h/t Sporting News, Pro Basketball Talk