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Report: Harvard basketball has below average APR scores for private colleges

Sep 14, 2013, 3:30 PM EST

Harvard v Arizona Getty Images

Harvard men’s basketball has seen a rise in its on the court success. The past two seasons, the Crimson has qualified for the NCAA tournament, and in March upset No. 3 seed New Mexico in the second round. Harvard is the favorite to win the Ivy League again, returning multiple starters in addition to Kyle Casey and Brandyn Curry rejoining the team.

However, according to The Harvard Crimson and Bloomberg.com, the men’s basketball team received the university’s lowest four-year average score (956) in the NCAA’s academic progress ratings. That score was below the average mark (967) compared to other private schools. The NCAA’s reports were posted in June and consists of a four-span, through the 2011-2012 season.

“Harvard has maintained our high academic standards for all students and student athletes,” Director of Athletic Communications Tim Williamson, said in an email. “The Ivy League has the most rigorous academic requirements of any athletic conference, and we are in full compliance with those standards.”

Next year, the APR reports will range from the 2009-2010 season to the 2012-2013 campaign, and Harvard is expecting a noticeable improvement in its basketball team’s score.

“An early calculation of the APR for next year indicates a perfect or near perfect score for our men’s basketball team, reaffirming the program’s continued commitment to academic achievement,” Williamson added.

The NCAA requires teams to maintain a four-year rolling APR of at least 900 or a two-year rolling APR of 930, or face a postseason ban. In June, six men’s basketball programs — Alabama State, Arkansas-Pine Bluff, Florida International, Grambling State, Mississippi Valley State and New Orleans – were barred from postseason play. Beginning next season, the four-year average will be moved up to 930, and the two-year average is increased to 940.

Harvard’s score was the lowest in the Ivy League, 25 points behind the program with the second-lowest score in the conference, Columbia.