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Father of former UCLA guard Shabazz Muhammad sentenced to 37 months in prison on fraud charges

Mar 27, 2014, 5:55 PM EDT

Minnesota v UCLA Getty Images

When freshman forward Shabazz Muhammad made the decision to leave UCLA and enter the 2013 NBA Draft, the general feeling was that the Bruins would be able to move on from what was at times a tumultuous season for the player and program. An NCAA investigation left Muhammad in limbo at the start of the season, resulting in his missing the first three games of the season.

Once on the court, the Pac-12 Co-Freshman of the Year was talented enough to help lead the Bruins to the Pac-12 regular season title. With Muhammad, a first round pick of the Minnesota Timberwolves, off the to the professional ranks and a new head coach (Steve Alford) in charge UCLA would move forward.

Unfortunately, a day before the Bruins were to take on No. 1 Florida in the Sweet 16 it was reported that Ron Holmes, Muhammad’s father, took out a loan based upon his son’s future earnings. Holmes, convicted on a charge of conspiracy to commit bank fraud mail fraud and wire fraud, was sentenced to 37 months in prison Thursday but it’s what multiple media outlets found in legal documents Wednesday that could be of concern to UCLA.

The NCAA’s 432-page rule book doesn’t permit loans based on athletic skill or a future as a professional athlete. The rules also don’t allow athletes or their families to accept benefits from agents that aren’t also available to the general student body. An agreement with an agent before an athlete’s eligibility is exhausted is a violation too. In 2012, the NCAA expanded the definition of an agent to include financial advisors and marketing representatives.

Also of note in the story written by Nathan Fenno of the Los Angeles Times is the fact that UCLA’s compliance office reported the loan to the NCAA when it learned of the loan, and according to the report the NCAA did not investigate the matter.

If the NCAA were to decide to look into the arrangement it would likely need testimony/cooperation from Muhammad, with the former player likely having to answer questions as to whether or not he knew of the loan when his father applied for it. With his career at the school having come to an end, there really wouldn’t be much of a reason for Muhammad to cooperate with an investigation into the loan.