Skip to content

Comparing Shabazz Napier, Kemba Walker is unfair but inevitable

Apr 2, 2014, 7:30 PM EDT

source: Getty Images

Getty Images

NEW YORK — For Shabazz Napier, there’s no sense in fighting it. The comparisons are coming whether he likes it or not. That’s simply what is going to happen when an All-American point guard carries a team on a deep run through March three years after another All-American point guard, Kemba Walker, carried the same program on a deep run through March.

Fair or not — it’s not, for the record — they are going to come flooding in as we get closer and closer to college basketball’s biggest stage, and for now, it seems as if Napier has accepted that fact even if he’s unlikely to embrace it.

“That’s for you guys to say. I don’t know. I’m just here trying to play basketball,” Napier said after his No. 7 seeded Huskies won the East Regional title with a 60-54 victory over No. 4 Michigan State on Sunday afternoon at Madison Square Garden. “Of course I’m going to be compared to him because what he did when he was here was just tremendous. It’s never going to be done again. I’m not out there trying to replace what he did.”

FINAL FOURAll Final Four coverage | X-Factors | Why each team can/won’t win

Napier, who hails from Boston, is right in one respect: What Walker did may never be replicated. He led a UConn team that was stocked with freshmen and sophomores to five wins in five days en route to a Big East tournament title and followed that up with six wins in three weeks, the last of which was a 53-41 victory over Butler in the national title game. That’s 11 wins in less than four weeks in the month of March.

That’s unheard of, and it’s one of the biggest reasons that Walker ended up being the No. 7 pick in the 2011 NBA Draft. It’s the single biggest reason that he will go down as arguably the most popular UConn Husky in the history of the storied program that Jim Calhoun built.

And it’s an impossible standard to try and hold Napier up to, especially when a very valid argument can be made that getting this UConn team to the Final Four is a more impressive accomplishment than Walker leading that 2011 team to a title. But at least we are comparing apples to apples here. What the duo has been able to accomplish on the court is at least similar, whereas their demeanors and skill sets differ substantially.

Walker is a freak of an athlete, one of the quickest and most athletic point guards in the NBA these days. He blows by people, using his jump shot as a counter to keep defenses from sloughing off of him. Napier’s game is much more crafty. I think he can dunk, but I’ve never actually seen him dunk in a game. He’s quick, but he doesn’t have sprinter speed. His biggest skill is his ability to keep an defender off balance and read which way his opponent is leaning. His biggest strength is his basketball IQ and savviness.

Walker is as gregarious as a kid can come, blessed with the kind of larger-than-life personality that can only be bred in the Bronx. His smile is infectious and his charm is contagious. Napier is quieter, more introverted. His approach to the game is workmanlike, and what defines him, as Calhoun put is, is “his incredible self-belief” and his ability to instill that belief in others.

source:

AP Photo

“These kids would follow him across the desert for a drink of water,” Calhoun said. “As much as any single other thing, Shabazz led this team. You could see him talking to them. His swagger, his positive arrogance about how good they are translates to every other player out there.”

That wasn’t an easy thing for Napier to develop, either.

He couldn’t have taken over the program at a more difficult point in time.

Napier was a freshman on the 2011 team that won the title. He was the sidekick to Walker in the back court, the point guard that allowed Calhoun to use Walker off the ball. He played a major role in bringing home UConn’s third championship banner and he was expected to take over the role that Walker vacated when he left for the NBA. Throw in the fact that UConn had a roster that included Jeremy Lamb, Andre Drummond, Alex Oriakhi and Roscoe Smith in Napier’s sophomore year, and UConn entered the preseason as a consensus top three team.

And it all went to hell.

The Huskies were a mess during Big East play, eventually flaming out of the first round of the NCAA tournament as a No. 9 seed. A lot of the blame got pinned on Napier that season. He was supposed to be the leader, and he wasn’t leading. As the saying goes, a point guard’s most important stat is his winning percentage. The issue, however, was that Napier simply didn’t know how to lead. He didn’t know how to differentiate between yelling and motivating. He didn’t know how to react to players laughing off a loss. He didn’t yet understand that every person is going to handle losing a different way, and while every loss was, for him, as bad as it could get, he couldn’t grasp that it was possible to be as competitive as he was without being as demonstratively distraught after a disappointing performance.

“He wasn’t mature enough,” Calhoun said. “He had to fine tune who Shabazz was. He tried to lead at a time when he couldn’t lead. Following Kemba Walker? That’s a tough act to follow. He wasn’t as good sophomore year when I coached as he should have been. Last year under Kevin he started to blossom a little bit. This year, that great Shabazz gave himself to his teammates.”

PREVIEWS: Wisconsin-Kentucky | UConn-Florida

Shabazz long ago climbed out of the shadow cast by Kemba and his national title. He did it when he led last year’s team to 20 wins despite the fact that there was no tournament waiting for them as the end of the season. He did it when he turned himself into an All-American this season. He did it with all of the big shots that he’s made throughout his career.

He may look like Walker from afar, and he may end up accomplishing the same thing, but the two differ as much as their accents.

“A lot of the things I do is what he did, because I learned from him,” Napier said. “He made it there, but I’m just out here trying to be myself and create my own path.”

There is one thing that Napier indisputably has in common with Walker, however: When he leaves UConn, he is going to be a tough act to follow.

Latest Posts
  1. Wisconsin students waste no time purchasing tickets for 2014-15 season

    Sep 17, 2014, 6:55 PM EDT

    Bo Ryan Bo Ryan

    “The Grateful Red” snapped up every available ticket within five minutes Wednesday morning.

  2. Penn State begins preseason training with new strength & conditioning challenge (VIDEO)

    Sep 17, 2014, 4:55 PM EDT

    Patrick Chambers Patrick Chambers

    The Nittany Lions return five of their top six scorers from a team that finished the 2013-14 season with a 16-18 record (6-12 Big Ten).

  3. Jim Boeheim calls Yahoo’s Coach K story ‘completely off-base’

    Sep 17, 2014, 4:04 PM EDT

    Jim Boeheim AP

    Jim Boeheim is not one to bite his tongue around the media.

  4. DePaul lands second front court recruit this week

    Sep 17, 2014, 1:43 PM EDT

    DMVElite 80 DMVElite 80

    Is Oliver Purnell is tapping into a D.C. pipeline?

  5. Two Missouri freshmen suspended after arrest (UPDATED)

    Sep 17, 2014, 12:15 PM EDT

    Kim Anderson AP

    Missouri will move on with team-related activities without two freshmen following an arrest.

  6. Five-star freshman JaQuan Lyle removed from Oregon roster

    Sep 17, 2014, 10:59 AM EDT

    Kelly Kline/Under Armour Kelly Kline/Under Armour

    Lyle was originally committed to Louisville before backing off.

  7. Watch Kentucky fans sprinting to line up for Big Blue Madness tickets (VIDEO)

    Sep 17, 2014, 10:03 AM EDT

    Via @J11Riley Via @J11Riley

    The rush for a good spot to wait for Big Blue Madness tickets is always entertaining.

  8. Tacko Fall, Class of 2015 7-foot-6 center, sets three visits

    Sep 16, 2014, 11:15 PM EDT

    (Nike) (Nike)

    The tallest player in high school basketball has some visits set.

  9. Arizona State cuts ties with junior college recruit following arrest

    Sep 16, 2014, 9:15 PM EDT

    jordan washington

    Arizona State has cut ties with a junior college forward and 2015 recruit was who arrested over the weekend.

  10. Bo Ryan hits golf balls into Wisconsin’s Camp Randall Stadium (PHOTO)

    Sep 16, 2014, 8:15 PM EDT

    Bo Ryan AP

    Bo Ryan shows he’s a big man on campus at Wisconsin following his Final Four appearance.

  11. Jalen Rose believes Chris Webber should apologize for what happened at Michigan

    Sep 16, 2014, 7:15 PM EDT

    AP AP

    Jalen Rose says that former teammates Chris Webber needs to apologize.

  12. Texas lands impact four-star guard in 2015 recruiting class

    Sep 16, 2014, 6:06 PM EDT

    (Kelly Kline/Under Armour) (Kelly Kline/Under Armour)

    The Longhorns pull in a commitment from a good guard in 2015.

  13. Vanderbilt fills out 2015 class with top 150 forward

    Sep 16, 2014, 5:46 PM EDT

    Kelly Kline/Under Armour Kelly Kline/Under Armour

    Kevin Stallings has earned four commitments in 2015.

  14. Thoughts on Antonio Blakeney, shoe companies and decommitments

    Sep 16, 2014, 4:44 PM EDT

    Antonio Blakeney (Nike) Antonio Blakeney (Nike)

    The five-star recruit decommitted from Louisville, and what it has to do with shoe companies.

  15. Pac-12’s conference schedule features Arizona-UCLA just once

    Sep 16, 2014, 2:55 PM EDT

    Arizona v UCLA Getty Images

    There are also a limited number of ugly road weeks.

  16. Report: Doug Wojcik’s settlement with Charleston worth six figures

    Sep 16, 2014, 11:52 AM EDT

    AP AP

    Wojcik was fired with cause for allegedly abusing his players.

  17. Top prospect in Class of 2014 signs endorsement deal with Under Armour

    Sep 16, 2014, 10:54 AM EDT

    BxqWQrkCcAAi0S1

    Mudiays $1.2 million deal with a team in China will now be significantly supplemented.

  18. Boston College point-shaving scandal portrayed in upcoming 30 for 30

    Sep 16, 2014, 9:50 AM EDT

    0216_large

    Have you ever seen ‘Goodfellas’? You’ll recognize one of the main players in this story.