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Nine teams ineligible for postseason play due to Academic Progress Rate numbers

May 14, 2014, 3:06 PM EDT

Mark Emmert AP

Regardless of what the opinions are when it comes to the effectiveness of the Academic Progress Rate, the fact of the matter is that the system is the one being used to monitor the academic progress of student-athletes. Programs are now required to post a multi-year score of at least 930, or a two-year average of 940, in order to be eligible for postseason competition.

On Wednesday the NCAA announced that nine men’s basketball programs will be ineligible due to their APR scores. Those schools are Alabama State, Appalachian State, Central Arkansas, Florida A&M, Houston Baptist, Lamar, Milwaukee, San Jose State and Southern.

Southern is a different case in that its academic data was deemed to be unusable by the NCAA earlier this spring. In late February it was reported that the school was working with the NCAA to get the proper data submitted, however on Wednesday it was stated that all Southern athletic programs are ineligible for postseason play.

In addition to the postseason bans there were some schools that were hit with reductions in practice time and scholarships. Eleven men’s basketball programs are facing Level One sanctions, which would result in a reduction of four hours and one day of practice time.

Those programs are: Appalachian State (they’re appealing this sanction), Binghamton, Cal-State Fullerton, Central Arkansas, Charlotte, Fairleigh Dickinson, Houston Baptist, Lamar, Milwaukee, San Jose State and Tennessee-Martin.

Three others (Alabama State, Florida A&M and FIU) are facing Level Two sanctions, which would result in not only the loss of practice time during the season but also limits what can be done athletically during the offseason. And one program, New Orleans, faces Level Three sanctions.

Those sanctions can also include a reduction in the number of available scholarships and limiting the amount of practice time for incoming athletes who don’t meet certain academic standards.

All nine programs banned from postseason play in 2012-13 (Bakersfield won its appeal to avoid a postseason ban), including national champion UConn, posted APR scores high enough to avoid a similar penalty in 2014-15. UConn’s multi-year score is 936, and of those schools Jacksonville State posted the highest multi-year score (956).

For schools whose multi-year scores did not meet or exceed the 930 threshold, a two-year average of 940 or better was good enough to remain eligible for postseason play.

  1. tomtravis76 - May 14, 2014 at 6:23 PM

    Shouldn’t the student athletes who are academically eligible be able to transfer schools without sitting out a year? This is a failure of the university, administrators, etc, why punish student athletes for the failures of its school?

  2. chalkruz1989 - May 15, 2014 at 12:08 PM

    Great point @Tomtravis76. As a coach, it’s not only your responsibility to find the best talent, but to also find high character players. If a student-athlete has a GPA that enables him to play however his teammates and staff didn’t hold up their end of the deal he should be able to transfer.

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